Stainless Steel Growler Review – Keg King’s Ultimate Growler

Ultimate Stainless Steel Growler

Keg King sent me their Ultimate stainless steel growler to review. I spent some time on a Saturday logging data to see how it holds up.

Why a Stainless Steel Growler?

Keg King’s Ultimate Growler is a 64-ounce stainless growler for transporting beer from a tap to somewhere you want to drink that beer. Many growlers are made of glass, but this one is made out of 304 stainless steel. Many pools, beaches, and other public locations do not allow glass containers for safety reasons; this is a good alternative package to avoid that problem.

Since this is a stainless steel growler, you do not need to be concerned about it breaking inadvertently. The constructions feels solid, and the heft feels nice in my hand. The brushed stainless provides a good grip, even when it is wet.

The neck of the growler is a comfortable diameter and allows for easy pouring.

This Seal Barks, not Growls

One story of the growler’s origin states that the original tin containers emitted a growling sound because the lid could not form a tight seal. This caused the lid to vibrate, emitting a low growling noise. The Ultimate Growler has a tight bale-top lid with a food-grade silicone gasket to form a tight seal that barked loud when the top was flipped open.

You won’t need to worry about your beer going flat as long as the lid is closed.

Who, me? I’m just Chillin’

Chilled Growler
Initial Temperature 40 F / 4.4 C

To test the vacuum insulation, I filled the growler with iced water. The temperature settled at 40 degrees.

The growler rested on the counter in a 60-degree F room. I monitored the temperature every few hours.

4 hours later, the temperature was 42 F / 5.5 C
8 Hours Later
Checking after 8.5 hours, the temp had risen to 44 F / 6.6 C
18 Hour Temperature rose 10 F
After 18 hours, the temperature rose to 50 F / 10 C

Temperatures in the growler rose 10 degrees F / 5.6 C over the course of 18 hours.

I am happy with this growler, and think it’s a good option to transport your beer without taking a full keg.

Bottling From the Keg

Capping Filled BottlesWhen I started homebrewing, I bottled every batch. Like many home brewers, things changed when I got everything needed to set up a keg system and a co2 tank.

The only problem is that occasionally I need to take a small quantity of beer somewhere. While the Blichmann Beer Gun is great for bottling beer for long-term storage, many times I need something fast.

It doesn’t get much faster and easier than using a bottling wand in the picnic tap already attached to your keg.

How do you fill bottles on short notice or quickly? Please post below.

 

HBW #9 – Kegging the Irish Red Ale

In this video, I finally get around to kegging the Irish red ale I brewed in my Homebrew Wednesday #6 video. My kegging process is pretty straightforward, and works pretty well. I’m relatively new to kegs, so I would appreciate any pointers from anyone with more experience (really, please leave a comment below).

One of my favorite tools for transferring is my auto-siphon. I use the 1/2″ size because it allows the transfers to happen more quickly. The 3/8″ auto-siphon can be used with a bottling wand if your bottling bucket does not have a spigot.

Keg systems can be a great alternative to bottling, but require more of an investment to get started.